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Bijou Picture Palace / Picture House
73 Cowcaddens Street

Originally the Oxford Cafe concert hall, a public house with a small auditorium above, then the Alexandra Music Hall from 1898. Run briefly by Arthur Hubner as the Royal Music Hall in 1899.
Opened as the Bijou in March 1908 by Ralph Pringle with seating for around 650 in stalls and a small wrap-around balcony. Accessed via a single stair, the hall was on the first and second floors of a tenement block.

Adjacent to the Theatre Royal, the Bijou was taken over by theatre owners Howard & Wyndham, and in 1901 some of its stage space in the upper floors was converted for use as a new crush bar for the circle of the Theatre Royal
Howard and Wyndham also made alterations to the Bijou's entrance in 1914 (see plans above by William Beattie Brown, who died shortly afterwords in action during the war). The Bijou closed as a cinema in 1930, following the tightening up of fire regulations after the Glen Cinema tragedy. 

1950s Section
According to plans dating from the late 1950s, when the Theatre Royal was being converted to television studios, parts of the Bijou hall were still extant, though the stage area had been taken over as part of the Grand Circle bar for the theatre by this point.
The auditorium has since been demolished, most likely when Scottish Television built their new headquarters in the 1970s which incorporate the site.

Some of the windows to Cowcaddens Street from the portion taken over by the theatre in 1901 can still be seen today; in the pictures below, those windows, and the approximate postion of the 1914 entrance, are highlighted in red.

During work to demolish the STV headquartes in July 2007, the proscenium area of the old Bijou was clearly visible, having been bricked up at some stage to separate the two buildings. A rare glimpse of it can be seen below; as it will not belong before it is covered up as part of the new development works on the site.

Information and plans courtesy of Mike Hall. has a Bijou ticket displayed here, and a programme from its days as the Alexandra Music Hall here.

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